Term of the Day

Dram Shop Liability

Dram Shop Liability refers to the rules, regulations, and laws imposed by the government on bars, taverns, or liquor stores.

One-Leg-Stand Test

Definition - What does One-Leg-Stand Test mean?

The Definition

The one leg stand test is a field test administered by an officer to determine if an individual is under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It is a type of Standardized Field Sobriety Test that is commonly used when officers come in contact with individuals they suspect might be affected by substances, especially if the individual is operating a motor vehicle on the road.

What it Entails

When an officer pulls over an individual who is under suspicion of driving under the influence, they will ask the individual to step out of the car. The officer will then ask them if they are okay with performing the one leg stand test. Once the individual agrees to performing the test, the officer will ask the individual to firmly plant one of their legs to the ground, and lift their other leg about six inches off the ground. They are asked to attempt to balance on the planted leg for around thirty seconds, of which the officer will count aloud. If the individual does any of the below actions, the officer could make the assumption that they are under the influence of drugs or alcohol:

  • Sways
  • Falls over
  • Uses their arms to balance themselves
  • Hops around
  • Puts their foot down quickly or frequently

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has run statistics on this field sobriety test, and has come to the conclusion that it has a 65% positivity rate of the individual indeed being under the influence if they fail the test. However, since multiple factors come into play with this type of test and sometimes it is not administered properly, it is not a test that could solely convict someone for DUI in a court of law. This test along with other performed field sobriety tests, however, are important to determine if the person is indeed guilty or not guilty.

(Read more: - drugs - alcohol - tests )






Related Pages


Previous Entry

No Contest Plea

Next Entry

Open Container Laws